Schools in Sant Cugat

If you move to Sant Cugat, here’s some of the schools that I’ve had direct experience with:

Two general notes:
  • Most "good" schools in Spain "cheat" on their high school test scores by making the bad students go somewhere else before graduation. So don't take the published scores too seriously.
  • There are no Spanish-only schools in Catalunya. There are private French-only, German-only, Italian-only, English-only, but sorry, no Spanish for you. If you are moving to Barcelona so your kids can learn Spanish, boy you are in for a surprise! There some international schools let your children do Spanish as long as your children are not Spanish citizens and you promise not to stay in Catalunya for more than a couple years.
Europa – Large private pretentious school that emphasizes an education in English, although most of the kids are from pija Catalan families. Despite the word "International" in the name of the school, there's relatively few international kids there and the kids all speak Spanish to each other. Like most private schools, the parents tend to be small-business owners or senior level corporate types. The education is "fire-and-forget" style, where the parents are expected to drop off the kids on time, but not much else. Children are not allowed to have lunch with their parents off campus (you must follow the program!). By no means is it a horrible school and we do know some reasonably nice parents who are very happy taking their kids there.

Agora –Large private somewhat less pretentious school that aims for a trilingual education in Catalan, Spanish and English. The school was ranked as one of the top 100 schools in Spain (and second best in Catalunya) by El Mundo. Most of the parents are business people from a Catalan background. There are not very many international students, and don't expect too much help if your kid can't speak at least Spanish. The arts, music (the kids can learn piano, cello or violin) and theatre programs are excellent. During lunch time they offer soccer and basketball (with weekend league play). The kids of the ultracompetitive parents go to the soccer team, so the basketball team is a bit more friendly to foreigners and/or wimpy kids. Despite being big, they are quite flexible about taking your (grand) kids for lunch or picking them up early for doctors appointments etc. The school is now venture capital owned so they tend to nickle and dime the parents for every little thing, especially the uniform. They don't make the kids wear Agora underwear yet, but I'm sure it's just a matter of time. They have a small campus in downtown Sant Cugat called Patufet that is very nice for P3-P5.

Benjamin Franklin – Has a bus from Sant Cugat, so it’s easy to get to. It’s bit of an Americana bubble though, with pretty high turnover from people that aren’t planning on living here for long. They have about 1/3 American, 1/3 International and 1/3 Spanish students. Very expensive, although I expect many people don’t pay it themselves (ie company pays). There's a core group of very nice parents and if you only speak English and want a social life via school, it's a great place to go.

St Peters - In Barcelona, but lots of kids from Sant Cugat go there (there's a bus). We know a couple spoiled brats that go there. Nothing like spoiled brats with finishing school accents.

Lycee Francais - In Barcelona, but has a good reputation. It used to be fashionable to learn French, but not so much anymore.

Swiss School - Heard good things about it. Your kids need to know German though.

Aula - A bunch of our neighbors go there. Looks good on paper (they do really well in science competitions), but if you talk to some of the alumni, it definitely has a dark side. It's extremely competitive to the point of ruining the self-esteem of kids that can't keep up. If you don't keep up, you get kicked out pretty quick. It has one Spanish speaking track, which at first we thought would be great, but it's full of kids of PP politicians and other right-wing types.

Deutsche Schule – Admissions is run by a old-school German woman that scares anyone who has ever met her. One neighbor's kid goes there and is quite happy. Unless your kids have perfect german and/or you have serious enchufe don’t bother. Montilla sends his kids there, what a hypocrite. They have a bus that goes to Sant Cugat.

La Farga, Viaro – Crazy right wing Opus Dei Catholic cult-school. If you meet a family with 8 children in Sant Cugat, they go to La Farga. If you happen to drive by in the evening you can sometimes see a bunch of people walking in circles. (Also, if you are in need of a social group, Opus people are very friendly, in a creepy cult-y sort of way.) Not sure exactly what they are doing. Viaro is apparently the school for the ultra-Opus people, whereas some reasonable people send their kids to La Farga due to higher Spanish language content. The fact that people are desperate enough for a Spanish education to put their children in the clutches of Opus Dei should tell you something. There isn't a lot of teacher supervision on the playground. The other day we were walking by and there was a group of kids sitting off in the forest smoking pot.

Waldorf School - In Bellatera. In Catalan but with lots of international parents, so English speaking kids won't stick out. Much less academically oriented for the first couple years, more focus on imagination, stories, arts, and music. European Waldorf schools more respectable than their hippie granola-eating North American bretheren, and have a very good reputation.

John Talabot - A very nice small concertada school in Barcelona that focuses on a trilingual education (English, Spanish, Catalan). We know a couple people that go there and love it. We decided against it mostly for logistical reasons.

American School of Barcelona – Not in Sant Cugat, but there’s a bus that goes from Sant Cugat at a relatively reasonable hour. The facilities are a bit down scale, but we’ve heard that the school has a very inclusive environment. There’s actually an anti-bully policy, which is (unfortunately) revolutionary for Spain.

Public Schools – With all the cutbacks, providing a good education has become very challenging for public schools. The quality of teachers is generally better than in private schools (you would be shocked at how little teachers get paid at some of the more expensive private school). However, your kids would have to deal with all the problem children that the other schools are not willing to deal with.

Escoles Bressol- We've had a very good experiences with these municipal preschools. They're not free, and it's hard to get into the downtown ones. Don't count your kids learning anything other than Catalan. However, they really teach the kids to be self-reliant. For example, in P2 the kids set up and put away the lunch table, help out in the vegetable garden, etc.

Other concertada schools – usually better than the public ones, and pretty cheap as well. They gotta be in Catalan, although some do clever things like pairing Catalan + Spanish/English speaking teachers together so that kids can learn more Spanish.

Not that I’m encouraging cheating (har har), but just so you are aware that everyone else does it: If you want to get into a concertada school, you need to live pretty close by, otherwise you won’t have the points to get in. Luckily it’s pretty easy to temporarily change your address to a friend’s place that lives nearby. Either get them to sign an authorization form or register your mobile phone billing address there as "proof" to get your empadronamiento changed. If you don’t do this, you basically have zero chances of getting in since everyone else cheats. Some parents in other parts of Spain even get “divorced” to get extra points for their kids to get into the right school.

Here's a post on how the points system works for public schools in Catalunya.

52 comments:

Daniela said...

I have just moved to Sant Cugat del Valles from Brussels. I think is very useful your information about the schools in the area as we are looking for a school for our 2 daughters. We are from South America and I don't like your comment about poor south america's people that comes here and have no idea about the catalan and what the teacher is saying. Best regards,
Daniela

Michael Costello said...

Hi, loved this post about the schools, spot on I think, very funny on La Farga too. Our kids go to Europa and we are considering a change, but I did not get much hope from your analysis. Which school did you choose in the end?

T Schuster said...

I find your post offensive, certainly not funny. My children go to one of these schools, but it's incredible how you managed to sound degrading on all of them.

santcugat said...

As long as it's equal-opportunity offensive, I'm ok with that.

StQgat fan said...

I'm amazed how foreign people can move countries and then feel totally comfortable "complaining" about the language of the area / country they moved to. Or trying to avoid it. Or pretending it doesn't exist! ?!? Especially if you have kids. In short, if you don't like it, don't come here! Did someone force you?
I can assure you that the South American kids understand a whole lot more of what is being explained in class in Catalan, than Catalan / Spanish kids in an English immersion class at Europa, for example. Kids don't learn a language just from being taught in that language in class. They learn the languages that are spoken in that culture. So regardless of which school you choose, if you choose to live here, your kids will learn Spanish and Catalan, and talk in both those languages in the playground of any school. Whether you like it or not!

In general I enjoyed the light humor in your comments, although I don't agree with the analysis of Agora nor of Europa, both of which I have had first hand experience. Agora is excellent both academically and the arts: sports, music, and art all play a huge role in the curriculum and day to day life of the kids, and it's wonderful. The atmosphere is great. I'm a big fan. Most parents there are extremely down to earth. Europa's facilites may look good on paper, but Agora is far ahead in every aspect (sport included).
In general though, St.Cugat is a great place to live with so many fantastic schools. The vast majority of public schools have an excellent reputation too.
Considering you didn't seem to particularly like any school, I'm wondering which you chose in the end, or if you remained "lost" in St.Cugat!

santcugat said...

You're right about Agora. I've updated the information.

Jeremy Holland said...

What happened to your original comment about people complaining about you complaining?

santcugat said...

Sorry, I decided to turn it into a post.

StQgat fan said...

Ok, agree!
I'm still crying with laughter re the underwear comment. I've also read further into your blog, and love to have all those little things we foreigners notice, down in writing. Any entry about Spanish hyperchondriac-ism? I'm thinking translations of phrases such as "golpe de aire"...
Living in the UK you'd be in grave danger of getting one most days.

Objective comments (good and bad) on different cultures are great, although I do feel sorry for anyone having to "put up" with a language he hates, and wonder how they get through the week with so much contact with it?!(I think you did use the word "hate" in one post).
Which school do your kids go to now? I hope they are settled after your bullying experiences.
Best regards

santcugat said...

Did I say I hated Catalan? I must have been having a really bad day. I was probably just venting.

It's not an unpleasant language. Just not that useful except for being Catalan. Kind of like Hebrew in Israel, but with the advantage of having less people trying to kill you.

monchi said...

Talking about public schools... It is said that Pins del Vallès, Catalunya and Joan Maragall (ordered this way) are the best ones. Of course, you'll only be able to get there if you live nearby (20 points I think) or work nearby (only 10 points). You get points for different aspects of your family (where you live, number of children, incomes, special educational needs, etc.). If you've got three children or more you're lucky, as you'll receive more points... but unfortunately only if there is a tie and they need to break it. About the almost racist comments... there are more newcomers now than ten years ago, but their attitude is different, and parents try to adapt to the country's culture. Most of them start in P3 (3 years old) so their opportunities to learn and practice Catalan, Spanish or any other language will be the same.

Anonymous said...

What are the ranges of monthly fees for a P4 in private and concertados schools in and around Sant Cugat?
I come as exchange researcher for only few months next year and I think that have no chance to get admitance in a public school for my 4-year old child (due to the short stay and non-compulsoty P4 status)and I was wondering what price ranges I should expect.

Also, do you have an idea what are the alternatives for daycare if you cannot find a place in pre-school (P4) for your child? (neither public, nor private)

Junius said...

I was wondering if I could interest you and your readers in a advocacy group working to defend the interests of English-speaking children attending Catalan schools. Here's our web site: http://sites.google.com/site/catangloampa/.

Thanks!

ChrisP said...

I lived in Barcelona for about 3 years. I found Catalan pretty and fairly easy to pick up. But I saw it more as a survival mechanism....it always helps to know when your prospective future mother-in-law is calling you a whore or threatening to report you to the police as a drug mule. I've forgotten most of the Catalan I learned, but I can't imagine it would be that hard to pick some up again and I know that if we do move, my kid will be better off socially if she learns it.

Anonymous said...

My daughter goes to Pureza de Maria in Sant Cugat, which is a religious school. My husband and myself are not particularly religious and I personally was a bit worried at the beginning that it would be too heavy. We had nothing to worry about. It is a wonderful school, with really caring staff and we are watching our daughter develop into a wonderful, caring and sensitive person who is also conscious of the fact that there are people in need in the world. From an academic point of view it is also really good. The weakest area is probably English however as she is trilingual we don't worry so much about that. If you want a place where everybody's feet is planted firmly on the ground, look no further.

Valéria said...

We thoroughly enjoy following your blog! Great cultural commentary.

Have you been able to make friends with other parents at the school, including the Catalan ones? Do they open up more if you speak to them in Catalan, as opposed to Castillian? We're very curious.

Anonymous said...

OK ! This is SCGAT not Barcelona. Ultra right wig people not found of US in general and the same goes for South American people, ( I was there as a Spaniard with my US born child) and we felt the dislike in three different languages. Worse bulling in my kids academic history because they dont have the parents involved in this very serious issue.
In a place like this the best is to find a group of people from all over the World, dont count on the locals. This is not a friendly place for foreigners.
I also worked in the private school system, Agora Erope etc..it's like the old days in Spain. Certain things won't change !!
Funny thing base on personal experience...my fellow Country people are nicer outside of Spain, back here in US soil they are much more open to other cultures, religion, politics views..bottom line they are more open to connect so they feel integrated.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

It seems that your kids did not fit in any school, your comments are offensive.
We use to live in Spain, my daughter learn Catalan in few months. Then I got a job offer in an english speaking country, and we moved again. She learnt enough english in this country in two months. We are from Southamerica..

D.K. said...

It's actually "fewer poor South Americans", not "less poor South Americans" . Just FYI. Greetings from South America.

Anonymous said...

Some people should not travel. I'm putting my kids in a local Catalan school. I want them to learn Catalan because I chose to live in Barcelona and I'd like them to know about the culture. I'd also be more than happy for them to be in school with South Americans (What's wrong with South Americans???) and if they picked up Spanish from them and learned about their cultures then even better.

Anonymous said...

Your message about La farga is so funny as I live next to a family with 7 kids that send half them there and the other half to the girls school! hahaha.
Also the joke about the south americans, dont take thing personally people. There are lots of poorer south americans here because they are the ones that had to emigrate to get work, the rich ones stayed at home. Just like the English get ribbed for being drunk bastards even though both the ones inside and outside are both drunken bastards. AND sorry but Catalan does suck and theres too much social an political pressure here to learn and speak it. Catalans need to get out of the 50m2 they live in, get the blinkers off and just get over it. Its god dm nearly indoctrination. My son went to a public school where spanish was banned They wouldnt even speak it to me! Not even on the school report. We have just taken him out as we find it ridiculous. Like it or not this is a part of spain and spanish should not be banned in any administrative or educational settings. A lot of people get peeved when they hear it but thats just a fact.

Anonymous said...

Your post is dishonest and unfair and you try to make it sound like it's the ultimate truth. Also, you contradict yourself several times and as a parent I feel insulted because you make us look like idiots for bringing our children to these schools.

First you say that if we want our kids to learn Spanish we are in for a surprise... but then you say that some schools like Europa, the school my kids go to, brag about how international they are when they actually only teach Spanish and Catalan, and how the kids talk to one another only in Spanish. So what is it then? Do our kids learn Spanish or not?
(the answer of course is yes they do)

Also you say that they will only be allowed to learn Spanish if they are not Spanish citizens and promise not to stay for more than two years? That is so not true, my kids are finishing what we would call high school and they have international friends who started when they were 3 or 4 years old and now they are teenagers and they not only have been "allowed" to stay here (sarcasm) but also they speak now perfect Spanish.

Also you say Europa parents are only expected to drop off the kids and that's it...Again as a parent I'm insulted. I follow my children development and I have constant meetings with their teachers. It is also true that there are lots of parents so busy with their jobs that maybe do not pay that much attention to their children education, but is that the school's fault? I don't think so.

Also about the thing with the train and the faces on it etc I don't think a little bit of competition hurts.

Finally...about having lunch with our children it is true that they are not allowed to have lunch outside the school (only P1 and P2 and baccalaureate students are) but this is because they have a tight schedule with lots of classes and after-school activities, one of the reasons why I'm so happy with the school.

Basically you just like complaining about things. I am really sorry you had such a bad experience but you sound like a hater and haters just like to hate. I just honestly feel sorry for your kids.

santcugat said...

I guess the irony of having to send your kids to an international school in Spain for them to learn speak Spanish is totally lost on you.

I'm glad I managed to insult you so many times since you sound like an idiot.

Anonymous said...

I know what irony is, thank you. But you got it wrong, I did not send them to an international school to learn Spanish but to learn English and other languages since I was born here in Spain and so were they. Their mother tongue are Spanish and Catalan but thanks to an international school now they are fluent in other languages as well.

And by the way it is so sad that to prove your point you have to insult someone...

Anonymous said...

Our school system might not be the best in the world, but at least you can leave your kids at school safe in the knowledge that no nutcase is going to walk in and start shooting the place up!

santcugat said...

The countries with the best educational systems in the world are Finland and South Korea, neither of which has any problems with people shooting up schools.

I wish Spanish people would try to be a little bit more ambitious and aim for slightly more than "we may not educate your kids well, but at least we don't kill them!"

Irene Pijpers said...

My daughter is going to Europa International School and I have to say it is a wonderful school. She loves it there! The school gives great support where ever they can and she has made many friends (eventhough she did not speak many English, and no Spanish or Catalan when we arrived). I truly can recommend Europa!

Anonymous said...

Hi,

My son goes to Europa and I totally disagree with the comments posted here.
-Many parents are really involved in the school, there are many parents activities and associations.
-The level is high, kids are expected to be fluent in 3 languages, but the story about the train about the grades is not true at all, grades are not published. The trains are used in Kindergarten for the birthdays!!!!!
My son, as well as many of our friends, are very happy with the school. Of course it is not perfect, but no school is.
There is an increasing number of foreign students and those whose native language is not Spanish receive support classes.

Anonymous said...

Useless biased information

Anonymous said...

I used to teach at Europa. It has some good points but most of the "leadership" of the school is afraid of the parents and is often not supportive of the teachers when there is a conflict with a student about behaviour or poor effort.It can be extremely political. There are some good teachers there though probably not as many as you would expect. They do work hard with full timetables often. I thought the English level was okay until the early years of the secondary school when it starts to fall away for many students, except the 20% better ones who are impressive. I do agree that there is a culture among parents that paying the fees allows them to wash their hands of responsibility...until they find something to complain about. The food is good there (but I don't think this is particularly important.) The library is terribel but the sporting facilities are very good.

Anonymous said...

I found your post very useful. We are also looking for some private school, since it is the only way to not have a catalan-only education and yes, Catalans, you do not speak spanish to foreigner which only speak spanish. It is a pity because you just show and teach your kids the important things in real life is talking catalan, not talking to people.
We are lost in looking for schools which are academically perfect, and very good in english... is it so much to ask for a private school?

Anonymous said...

Hi. Amusing but not accurate information. Having worked at a couple of the schools and being a parent at one I don't find your descriptions correct.

Anonymous said...

My son is 8 years old and I am now changing him again from a private Catalan school. Well trilingual the last one due to what I would call bullying.. He is not allowed to play football on the patio with the children because they don't think he is good enough to play with them, so he plays alone. I have spoken with the teacher since the beginning of the year and she thinks to seem that everything is fine. My son is fluent in 3 languages and speaks some french and Chinese. I am now thinking of putting him in a British school. Any thoughts on the discipline and the level of education in comparison with a Spanish school? Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Hey Lost, crec que no has entés res... ,tenies Tijuana més a la vora. Si mai li fots una abraçada al Pí de'n Xandri, mira de no fer com els gossos. Honora la terra que trepitjes i pixa allà on sigui permés...

Ara, ets català, disfruuuta-ho. I no deixis d'escriure.

Bernie S. Lyons

Anonymous said...

Anonymous from February 6th. You clearly have an axe to grind, don't you?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous from February 6th. You clearly have an axe to grind, don't you?

Carlos Fernando said...

Great post! I showed my mom. We are in Sant Cugat because I play tennis @ BTT. She started with a stupid idea to put me in a school here "to have a spanish experience". I am a homeschooler. But I studied at a "prestigious" Swiss School in Rio de Janeiro. All schools are terrible. They are only expensive daycares. I recommend to everyone to join a nice tennis academy and do homeschooling. You learn more and stay healthy with lots of great friends that are happy too because they are the whole day in the sun, playing while the other kids are suffering at schools.

Anonymous said...

Hahaha, this is hilarious.

Anonymous said...

I have to agree with some of the people here who found this post pretty offensive. As a non-Spaniard, but one who has lived in Spain for longer than this blogger, I find the comments demeaning, insulting and frankly just plain rude. She talks about Catalans (in Sant Cugat, presumably) being closed and impossible to talk to (in another post) which has been the complete opposite of our experience. My wife and I have been embraced by our new friends here completely. Perhaps the blogger offends people in person as readily as here. A little like a bull in a china shop, Lost? Sorry to be so blunt, but I just take big offense at people (unfortunately this is more true of Americans than people of other nationalities....and as an American I can say that) who feel that they can go into a place and tell everyone what they are doing wrong. I don't know you personally, but I think perhaps a bit less judgement and a bit more cultural sensitivity could go a long way...

Anonymous said...

It's a shame that this post caused so much offense and aggressiveness.
I was looking for useful information regarding schools in Sant Cugat but didn't got to find out much in the end...
I'd be interested to have some useful feedback about Agora.

Anonymous said...

I am a South American so I obviously want my kids to learn Spanish, I must admit that I was a bit shocked by how strong catalan is here.
However, I disagree with a previous comment saying how catalans won't speak in spanish to foreigners. I did not experience that at all. I don't speak or understand catalan (yet) and I got around perfectly well in spanish. I know people who have lived in BCN for years and only speak spanish.

Frank said...

I like your comments about the "bi- tri lingual" schools around Sant Cugat,and from my experience I know that most of the local parents do not get involved school-wise as we do in the States, however I want to know as a kind of advice what school do you recommend me to look for. I am moving next summer to Barcelona for a 3 year period, and I would be more prompt to live in Sant Cugat, my kids are in 2nd and 3rd grade although I have a little one with 3 years old who receives Special Education since he has Autism in a mild- moderate scale range. I do speak some Catalan and Spanish, nonetheless my kids speak English only. We are from Texas and I wonder how hard will be for them to learn the language or in the case of my little one be able to receive Special Ed. if exists over there.
Thanks,
Frank

ManOfTorreBlanca said...

I found this post very useful when I was looking for a school for my kids back in 2011. Back then we had decided on Europa International School. 3 years later I do not totally regret that decision. They were really great in helping the kids learn Spanish in the International Home Room and adapt to the new environment. However I have to confess till the school started that fall, we did not realize that us and just a few more families in the school were making it "International" and that 95% if not higher are the Catalan families. Also it took quite a while for us to notice that the English level of the kids could develop to be so low in this school. The number of native teachers in the school is very limited. Hence the kids read English words in Spanish even when they try to speak English. Most Catalan families do not really notice that their kids are not learning good English in this school which is sad. I know 2 expat families who took their kids out for this reason and especially this year it became a bigger worry for us. The other topic I have to mention is that the school comes up with many add-ons. What I pay in practice is much higher than one might think looking at the tuition fees. If I could go back in time, I would prefer one of the British or American schools. The mixture of Catalan, Spanish, English, French, and (German or Chinese) in this school is not helping the kids to learn one thing right before moving to the next especially because they have so few native speakers.

B+J said...

Hi!

Interesting article about the schools... I was wondering if anybody knows about a playgroup for kids approximately 4 years of age?

I'm looking for one, available for a Catalan/Spanish speaking little girl with basic English. Just to be clear, the group would be English speaking.
Cheers! :)

nancy welch said...

B&J, if you find one I would be interested in knowing too. I have a three year old little boy who I don't want to send to school for 5 days a week. A good preschool/playgroup would be a great alternative.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your blog about schools.
Do you have information of other schools in Barcelona like Oak House, Colegio Montserrat, La Salle, etc?

Anonimous said...

Hi everyone,
We will be moving this summer to Barcelona and would appreciate any help regarding international schools. We lived for over six years in Austin, Tx and the past year we spent in Italy. We have two daughters, upcoming six grader and tenth grader. Both girls are native English speakers. We visited so far Benjamin Franklin and Kensington School, and were very happy with the program offered by the American school, pretty much the same to what the girls had beck in Tx, however so far we only have spot for our younger one, and are on the wait list for the older daughter. Meanwhile, we are looking for another school in case we won't get any opening by September. I wish for the girls to learn Spanish and Catalan but our emphasis go for either American/UK curriculum and Ib program. We would appreciate your help, and any experience you had so far with international schools. We will be visiting soon Europa International School, and maybe the Barcelona international school in Sitges.
Thank you and good luck to all parents!

Anonymous said...

As a Catalan expat in California I find very encouraging that our native language is alive and well. I speciallly enjoyed the comment on how surprising it was to realize that Catalan is still so strong. I encara m'agrada més el comentary del senyor Lyons defensant la nostra cultura. Love to all the appreciative, open minded foreigners that are enjoying themselves in beautiful Catalunya!

Anonymous said...

Hi, as a comment to the Catalan expat in California and some others: we moved to Catalonia from northern Europe and are trying to learn both Catalan and Spanish. Let's imagine someone chooses to move to Estonia; would you dare to offend the native Estonians by refusing to learn Estonian and insisting on using "the more useful" Russian only? Of course I understand the historical differences, but still find it very strange how even some Catalan families do not see the value in making their own language thrive as a language of culture, education, business and life in general.

Silvia Fernandez-Diaz said...

LOL! you are so funny and right! Your comments are both entertaining and accurate. I'm from Barcelona but I've been living abroad for 10 years now and next year we are relocating back to Barcelona with our kids and just started to check on schools and so on...I agree with you in almost everything, it is also my feeling that there are lots of bullshitters out there. I want to take them to an International School because there is a big fat chance we leave the country after 2 years and the kids need to be prepare for that..but I'm not sure there is an International/"International" School more worried in teaching than getting into my pocket..We'll see.. thanks for your tips

Cecilie said...

Hello, I'm sorry if I have missed it in your post, but are you familiar with nurseries at all? We are moving to Barcelona at the end of March and have 2 children (1+2 years old). Thank you so much for any information or advice you may have.

Mark Lugo said...

Actually love this post. Being American, lived in Costa Rica for a decade. My youngest son began his school "career" in Costa Rica private school... Then, we relocated to Barcelona... Did the private school tour... (not heavily impressed). Really didn't want my child to become obsessed with the material things that fill a person in a material, capitalist heavy society.... Entered public school.... Beat the Catalan pupils in a literature competition his first year... Go figure. As a person who dedicates time to inner school education in the USA, I know for a fact - Parents have 90% of the responsibility when it comes to making sure the education that child gets is the right one... not simply making money to make it someone else's responsibility. Which is 90% the norm anywhere money has become the new "cool". Cheers. Overall great article and pretty accurate.